Archive for April, 2015

<8PM EDT> Tune In Live On Spreaker <8PM EDT>

***Note: The405 is no longer doing live weekdays shows.

Suspect Dies Baltimore

Baltimore Is a Democrat Problem, Not America’s Problem

Cold War Radio can also be heard on iHeart Radio.

iheart radio1

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Show Notes:

Iran Intercepts Cargo Ship, US Moves to Respond

181 Clinton Foundation Donors Who Lobbied Hillary’s State Department

Baltimore Is a Democrat Problem, Not America’s Problem

Iran Supreme Leader: ‘Ridiculous That Even Though US President Is Black, Still Such Crimes Against US Blacks’

Today In Cold War History

1949 – The Hukbalahap are accused of assassinating former First Lady of the Philippines Aurora Quezon, while she is en route to dedicate a hospital in memory of her late husband; her daughter and ten others are also killed.
1952 – Dwight D. Eisenhower resigns as Supreme Allied Commander of NATO.
1952 – Occupied Japan: The United States occupation of Japan ends as the Treaty of San Francisco, ratified September 8, 1951, comes into force.
1952 – The Sino-Japanese Peace Treaty (Treaty of Taipei) is signed in Taipei, Taiwan between Japan and the Republic of China to officially end the Second Sino-Japanese War. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the war merged into the greater conflict of World War II as a major front of what is broadly known as the Pacific War. The Second Sino-Japanese War was the largest Asian war in the 20th century. It also made up more than 90% of the casualties in the Pacific War.
1965 – United States occupation of the Dominican Republic: American troops land in the Dominican Republic to “forestall establishment of a Communist dictatorship” and to evacuate U.S. Army troops.
1969 – Charles de Gaulle resigns as President of France.
1970 – Vietnam War: U.S. President Richard M. Nixon formally authorizes American combat troops to fight communist sanctuaries in Cambodia.
1975 – General Cao Văn Viên, chief of the South Vietnamese military, departs for the US as the North Vietnamese Army closed in on victory.
1977 – The Red Army Faction trial ends, with Andreas Baader, Gudrun Ensslin and Jan-Carl Raspe found guilty of four counts of murder and more than 30 counts of attempted murder.
1977 – The Budapest Treaty on the International Recognition of the Deposit of Microorganisms for the Purposes of Patent Procedure is signed.
1978 – President of Afghanistan, Mohammed Daoud Khan, is overthrown and assassinated in a coup led by pro-communist rebels.
1986 – The United States Navy aircraft carrier USS Enterprise becomes the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to transit the Suez Canal, navigating from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea to relieve the USS Coral Sea.
1986 – High levels of radiation resulting from the Chernobyl disaster are detected at a nuclear power plant in Sweden, leading Soviet authorities to publicly announce the accident.
1987 – American engineer Ben Linder is killed in an ambush by U.S.-funded Contras in northern Nicaragua. Linder’s death quickly inflamed the already-polarized debate inside the United States, with opponents of U.S. policy decrying the use of taxpayers’ dollars to finance the killing of an American citizen as well as thousands of Nicaraguan civilians.
The administration fought back, with White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater quoted in The New York Times as saying that U.S. citizens working in Nicaragua had “put themselves in harm’s way”. Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams, an ardent proponent of the Contra War, echoed that view, saying that Linder should have known better than to be in a combat zone.

Rachel Maddow Complains That Police In Baltimore Are ‘Out Of Control’

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

cwr1_mugs

Advertisements

<8PM EDT> Tune In Live On Spreaker <8PM EDT>

***Note: The405 is no longer doing live weekdays shows.

 

Cold War Radio can also be heard on iHeart Radio.

191

Stand Your Ground Laws: An Antidote For Baltimore-Style Riots

iheart radio1

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Show Notes:

Police Make Arrests, Officers Hurt In Clash With Rioters

Stand Your Ground Laws: An Antidote For Baltimore-Style Riots

A Mad Max Nation with No Electrical Grid

Conservatives, Unleash the Awesome Power of “No”

Today In Cold War History
1950 – Apartheid: In South Africa, the Group Areas Act is passed formally segregating races.
1953 – Operation Moolah offers $50,000 to any pilot who defected with a fully mission-capable Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 to South Korea. The first pilot was to receive $100,000. Communist forces introduced the MiG-15 to Korea on November 1, 1950. USAF pilots reported that the performance of the MiG-15 was superior to all United Nations (U.N.) aircraft, including the USAF’s newest plane, the F-86 Sabre. The operation focused on influencing Communist pilots to defect to South Korea with a MiG for a financial reward.
The success of the operation is disputable since no Communist pilot defected before the armistice was signed on July 27, 1953. However, on September 21, 1953, North Korean pilot Lieutenant No Kum-Sok flew his MiG-15 to the Kimpo Air Base, South Korea, unaware of Operation Moolah. The Soviet Union had gone through great lengths to disguise their involvement in the Korean War. Russian pilots were taught Mandarin in order to deceive U.N. pilots. USAF pilots noted after the 27th, they had not heard any Russian chatter on the intercoms of MiG-15s from the Soviet Union’s “Honchos” pilots.
Between May 8–31, 56 MiG-15s were destroyed with only one F-86 loss in the same period. USAF pilots noticed that Communist pilots who observed USAF aircraft flying near their airspace prior to any engagement, bailed from their aircraft to ensure their personal survival.
General Clark received reports of the poor quality of Communist pilots after the leaflet drops of Operation Moolah, their worst piloting of the war. Communist pilots flew fewer sorties in the 90 days after Operation Moolah than in the 90 days before the first leaflet drop. U.N. pilots shot down 155 MiG-15’s to three F-86 aircraft in that period.
1960 – Togo gains independence from French-administered UN trusteeship.
1961 – Sierra Leone is granted its independence from the United Kingdom, with Milton Margai as the first Prime Minister.
1974 – Ten thousand march in Washington, D.C., calling for the impeachment of U.S. President Richard Nixon
1978 – Former United States President Nixon aide John D. Ehrlichman is released from an Arizona prison after serving 18 months for Watergate-related crimes.
1986 – The city of Pripyat as well as the surrounding areas are evacuated due to Chernobyl disaster.
1987 – The U.S. Department of Justice bars Austrian President Kurt Waldheim from entering the United States, saying he had aided in the deportation and execution of thousands of Jews and others as a German Army officer during World War II.

Rumors Of Death, Paralysis Surround The Fate of ISIS Leader Baghdadi

 

 

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

cwr1_mugs

<8PM EDT> Tune in live on The405Media <8PM EDT>

190

Executions Surge In Iran After Nuclear Talks, Iran Off U.S. Terror List

 

Cold War Radio can also be heard on Spreaker and iHeart Radio.

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

Something for everyone.405

cwr1_mugs

Show Notes:

U. Of Florida Frat Accused Of Spitting On Veterans, Peeing On American Flag

NYT Reporter: Clinton Foundation Lied About Bill Clinton Meeting With Kazakhstan Officials

More GOP Failure Theater: We Have To Save Obamacare In Order To Destroy It

Executions Surge In Iran After Nuclear Talks, Iran Off U.S. Terror List

Today In Cold War History
1953 – Winston Churchill is knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.
1955 – The Bandung Conference ends: Twenty-nine non-aligned nations of Asia and Africa finish a meeting that condemns colonialism, racism, and the Cold War.
1957 – Suez Crisis: The Suez Canal is reopened following the introduction of UNEF peacekeepers to the region.
1965 – Civil war breaks out in the Dominican Republic when Colonel Francisco Caamaño, overthrows the triumvirate that had been in power since the coup d’état against Juan Bosch.
1967 – Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov dies in Soyuz 1 when its parachute fails to open. He is the first human to die during a space mission.
1967 – Vietnam War: American General William Westmoreland says in a news conference that the enemy had “gained support in the United States that gives him hope that he can win politically that which he cannot win militarily.”
1968 – Mauritius becomes a member state of the United Nations.
1970 – The first Chinese satellite, Dong Fang Hong I, is launched.
1971 – Soyuz 10 docks with Salyut 1.
1980 – Eight U.S. servicemen die in Operation Eagle Claw as they attempt to end the Iran hostage crisis. Operation Eagle Claw was a United States Armed Forces operation ordered by US President Jimmy Carter to attempt to end the Iran hostage crisis by rescuing 52 diplomats held captive at the embassy of the United States, Tehran on 24 April 1980. Its failure, and the humiliating public debacle that ensued, damaged US prestige worldwide. Carter concluded that the failure to free the hostages played a major role in Ronald Reagan’s victory in the 1980 US presidential election. The operation encountered many obstacles and was eventually aborted. Eight helicopters were sent to the first staging area, Desert One, but only five arrived in operational condition. One encountered hydraulic problems, another got caught in a cloud of very fine sand, and the last one showed signs of a cracked rotor blade. During planning it was decided that the mission would be aborted if fewer than six helicopters remained, despite only four being absolutely necessary. In a move that is still discussed in military circles, the commanders asked President Carter for permission to abort and Carter granted the request.
As the U.S. force prepared to leave, one of the helicopters crashed into a transport aircraft which contained both servicemen and jet fuel. The resulting fire destroyed both aircraft and killed eight servicemen. Operation Eagle Claw was one of Delta Force’s first missions.
1990 – STS-31: The Hubble Space Telescope is launched from the Space Shuttle Discovery.

Muslim Woman in Arizona Runs Away From Arranged Marriage, Gets Beaten and Raped

iheart radio1

<8PM EDT> Tune in live on The405Media <8PM EDT>

189

Cruz Supports Armed Soldiers On U.S. Military Bases

 

Cold War Radio can also be heard on Spreaker and iHeart Radio.

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

Something for everyone.405

cwr1_mugs

Show Notes:

The Price of Dhimmitude

Grassley: FBI Obstructing Fast And Furious, Other Investigations

It’s No Big Deal, But ISIS Might Be In Afghanistan

Mother of Fallen Navy Seal Pens Scathing Letter to General Dempsey

Today In Cold War History
1960 – Brasília, Brazil’s capital, is officially inaugurated. At 09:30, the Three Powers of the Republic are simultaneously transferred from the old capital, Rio de Janeiro.
1964 – A Transit-5bn satellite fails to reach orbit after launch; as it re-enters the atmosphere, 2.1 pounds (0.95 kg) of radioactive plutonium in its SNAP RTG power source is widely dispersed.
1967 – Greek military junta of 1967–74: A few days before the general election in Greece, Colonel George Papadopoulos leads a coup d’état, establishing a military regime that lasts for seven years.
The coup leaders placed tanks in strategic positions in Athens, effectively gaining complete control of the city. At the same time, a large number of small mobile units were dispatched to arrest leading politicians, authority figures, and ordinary citizens suspected of left-wing sympathies, according to lists prepared in advance. One of the first to be arrested was Lieutenant General Grigorios Spandidakis, Commander-in-Chief of the Greek Army. The colonels persuaded Spandidakis to join them, having him activate a previously-drafted action plan to move the coup forward. Under the command of paratrooper Lieutenant Colonel Kostas Aslanides, the LOK took over the Greek Defence Ministry while Pattakos gained control of communication centers, the parliament, the royal palace, and — according to detailed lists — arrested over 10,000 people.
By the early morning hours, the whole of Greece was in the hands of the colonels. All leading politicians, including acting Prime Minister Panagiotis Kanellopoulos, had been arrested and were held incommunicado by the conspirators. At 6:00 a.m. EET, Papadopoulos announced that eleven articles of the Greek constitution were suspended. One of the consequences of these suspensions was that anyone could be arrested without warrant at any time and brought before a military court to be tried.
U.S. critics of the coup included then-Senator Lee Metcalf, who criticised the Johnson Administration for providing aid to a “military regime of collaborators and Nazi sympathisers.” Phillips Talbot, the U.S. ambassador in Athens, disapproved of the coup, complaining that it represented “a rape of democracy”, to which John M Maury, the CIA station chief in Athens, answered, “How can you rape a whore?”[
1970 – The Hutt River Province secedes from Australia as the Principality of Hutt River.
1987 – The Tamil Tigers are blamed for a car bomb that detonates in the Sri Lankan capital city of Colombo, killing 106 people.
1989 – Tiananmen Square protests of 1989: In Beijing, around 100,000 students gather in Tiananmen Square to commemorate Chinese reform leader Hu Yaobang.

Cruz Supports Armed Soldiers On U.S. Military Bases

iheart radio1

<8PM EDT> Tune in live on The405Media <8PM EDT>

188

Us Warship Heads To Yemeni Waters; Could Block Iran Weapons

 

Cold War Radio can also be heard on Spreaker and iHeart Radio.

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

Something for everyone.405

cwr1_mugs

Show Notes:

Us Warship Heads To Yemeni Waters; Could Block Iran Weapons

Who Authorized Obama To Kick Over The Nuclear Balance?

Why ISIS Advises Western Jihadists to Carry Nerf Guns and Condoms

Sexy Conservatives Will Out-Breed Barren Liberals

Today In Cold War History
1968 – English politician Enoch Powell makes his controversial Rivers of Blood speech. Enoch Powell’s April 20, 1968 address to the General Meeting of the West Midlands Area Conservative Political Centre (commonly called “Rivers of Blood”) was a speech criticising Commonwealth immigration, and anti-discrimination legislation that had been proposed in the United Kingdom.
1972 – Apollo 16, commanded by John Young, lands on the moon.
1974 : The continuing violence between the two para-military organizations in Northern Ireland claims its 1,000th victim with the death earlier today of a petrol station owner James Murphy in County Fermanagh.
1975 : Communists have amassed 100,000 troops and Armour on the outskirts of Saigon for a final push and President Thieu has resigned saying the US promised aid which has not been forthcoming
1978 – Korean Air Lines Flight 902 is shot down by the Soviet Union. Soviet air defense shot down Korean Air Lines Flight 902 (KAL 902) near Murmansk, Soviet Union, after the civilian aircraft violated Soviet airspace and failed to respond to Soviet ground control and interceptors. Soviet air defense initially identified it as part of the US air reconnaissance force, which carried out thousands of flights along Soviet borders annually at the time. Captain Alexander Bosov, pilot of the Sukhoi Su-15 that brought down Flight 902, saw Asian logogram characters on the tail of the Korean aircraft, and reported this to the ground control. Despite this, Vladimir Tsarkov, commander of the 21st Soviet Air Defense Corps, ordered Bosov to take down the plane, as the plane failed to respond to repeated orders to land, and was approaching the Soviet border with Finland. The Su-15 opened fire, forcing the plane to descend, and killing two of the 109 passengers and crew members aboard Flight 902. The plane made an emergency landing on the frozen Korpijärvi lake near the Finnish border.
1980 – Climax of Berber Spring in Algeria as hundreds of Berber political activists are arrested.
1990 : The economy in USSR continues to worsen with more food and other items becoming scarcer and more rationing put in place.

NYC Mayor De Blasio Positioning Himself Against Hillary For Nomination

 

iheart radio1

<8PM EDT> Tune in live on The405Media <8PM EDT>

187

An Invasion Of Refugees

Cold War Radio can also be heard on Spreaker and iHeart Radio.

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

Something for everyone.405

cwr1_mugs

Show Notes:

Egyptian Government Arrests Muslim Who Worked For The Obama Administration And Sentences Him To Life In Prison

Jeb Bush: Legal Status For Illegals ‘Rational, Thoughtful’

Tension Between BLM And Mining Operation, Oath Keepers Set Up Camp

Iran “Deal”: West’s Surrender Triggering War

An Invasion Of Refugees

Today In Cold War History
1949 – At midnight 26 Irish counties officially leave the British Commonwealth. A 21-gun salute on O’Connell Bridge, Dublin, ushers in the Republic of Ireland.
1961 – Bay of Pigs Invasion: A group of Cuban exiles financed and trained by the CIA lands at the Bay of Pigs in Cuba with the aim of ousting Fidel Castro.
The first part of the plan was to destroy Castro’s tiny air force, making it impossible for his military to resist the invaders. On April 15, 1961, a group of Cuban exiles took off from Nicaragua in a squadron of American B-26 bombers, painted to look like stolen Cuban planes, and conducted a strike against Cuban airfields. However, it turned out that Castro and his advisers knew about the raid and had moved his planes out of harm’s way. Frustrated, Kennedy began to suspect that the plan the CIA had promised would be “both clandestine and successful” might in fact be “too large to be clandestine and too small to be successful.”
But it was too late to apply the brakes. On April 17, the Cuban exile brigade began its invasion at an isolated spot on the island’s southern shore known as the Bay of Pigs. Almost immediately, the invasion was a disaster. The CIA had wanted to keep it a secret for as long as possible, but a radio station on the beach (which the agency’s reconnaissance team had failed to spot) broadcast every detail of the operation to listeners across Cuba. Unexpected coral reefs sank some of the exiles’ ships as they pulled into shore. Backup paratroopers landed in the wrong place. Before long, Castro’s troops had pinned the invaders on the beach, and the exiles surrendered after less than a day of fighting; 114 were killed and over 1,100 were taken prisoner.
1969 – Sirhan Sirhan is convicted of assassinating Robert F. Kennedy.
1969 – Communist Party of Czechoslovakia chairman Alexander Dubček is deposed.
1970 – Apollo program: The ill-fated Apollo 13 spacecraft returns to Earth safely.
1971 – The People’s Republic of Bangladesh forms, under Sheikh Mujibur Rahman at Mujibnagor.
1975 – The Cambodian Civil War ends. The Khmer Rouge captures the capital Phnom Penh and Cambodian government forces surrender.
1978 – Mir Akbar Khyber is assassinated, provoking a communist coup d’état in Afghanistan.
1984 – Police Constable Yvonne Fletcher is killed by gunfire from the Libyan People’s Bureau (Embassy) in London during a small demonstration outside the embassy. Ten others are wounded. The events lead to an 11-day siege of the building.
1986 – The Three Hundred and Thirty Five Years’ War between the Netherlands and the Isles of Scilly ends.
1986 – Nezar Hindawi’s attempt to detonate a bomb aboard an El Al flight from London to Tel Aviv is thwarted.

Air Force Confirms Shuttering Of Vital Airlift Wing

iheart radio1

<8PM EDT> Tune in live on The405Media <8PM EDT>

186a

ISIS Camp A Few Miles From Texas, Mexican Authorities Confirm

Cold War Radio can also be heard on Spreaker and iHeart Radio.

Chat room is open. Like us on FaceBook and Follow us on Spreaker

Help Cold War Radio/Steel City Resistance Take the show on the road.

Get your Cold War Radio gear at the Bunker. Proceeds go directly to show development and on location interviews.

Something for everyone.405

cwr1_mugs

Show Notes:

ISIS Camp A Few Miles From Texas, Mexican Authorities Confirm

Obama’s Nuclear Framework Agreement Is A Hoax

Clinton Campaign Kicks Off As Huma Abedin Probe Begins

USA RIP: Look What NY Democrats Are Giving To Non-Citizens

Today In Cold War History
1958 – The Soviet satellite Sputnik 2 falls from orbit after a mission duration of 162 days.
1967 – Gnassingbé Eyadéma overthrows President of Togo Nicolas Grunitzky and installs himself as the new president, a title he would hold for the next 38 years.
1978 – 1978 Tbilisi Demonstrations: Thousands of Georgians demonstrate against Soviet attempts to change the constitutional status of the Georgian language.
1981 – STS-1 – The first operational space shuttle, Columbia (OV-102) completes its first test flight.
1986 – In retaliation for the April 5 bombing in West Berlin that killed two U.S. servicemen, U.S. president Ronald Reagan orders major bombing raids against Libya, killing 60 people.
1988 – The USS Samuel B. Roberts strikes a mine in the Persian Gulf during Operation Earnest Will. The mine blew a 15-foot (5 m) hole in the hull, flooded the engine room, and knocked the two gas turbines from their mounts. The blast also broke the keel of the ship; such structural damage is almost always fatal to most vessels. The crew fought fire and flooding for five hours and saved the ship. Among other steps, sailors cinched cables on the cracked superstructure in an effort to stabilize it.[1] She used her auxiliary thrusters to get out of the mine field at 5kts. She never lost combat capability with her radars and Mk13 missile launcher. Ten sailors were medevaced by HC-5 CH-46s embarked on USS San Jose for injuries sustained in the blast; six returned to the Roberts in a day or so. Four burn victims were sent for treatment to a military hospital in Germany, and eventually to medical facilities in the United States. U.S. responds with operation Praying Mantis.
Operation Earnest Will (24 July 1987 – 26 September 1988) was the American military protection of Kuwaiti-owned tankers from Iranian attacks in 1987 and 1988, three years into the Tanker War phase of the Iran–Iraq War. It was the largest naval convoy operation since World War II.
The U.S. Navy warships that escorted the tankers, part of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command, were the operations’ most visible part, but U.S. Air Force AWACS radar planes provided surveillance and U.S. Army special operations helicopters hunted for possible attackers.
Other U.S. Navy vessels participated in Operation Earnest Will. They were then under the command of the U.S. Navy’s Seventh Fleet which had primary responsibility for combat operations in the Persian Gulf region. The numerous ships used in Operation Earnest Will mostly consisted of Battleship Battle Groups, Carrier Battle Groups, Surface Action Groups and ships from the Pacific’s Third and Seventh Fleets and the Mediterranean-based Sixth Fleet. They generally operated in and near the Gulf for parts of their normal six-month deployments.

1988 – In a United Nations ceremony in Geneva, Switzerland, the Soviet Union signs an agreement pledging to withdraw its troops from Afghanistan.
1991 – The Republic of Georgia introduces the post of President after its declaration of independence from the Soviet Union.

Congressman Criticizes Obama’s Removal Of Cuba From Terrorism List

iheart radio1