Cold War Radio #101

Posted: September 26, 2014 in Uncategorized

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101

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Show Notes:

Muslims Flee Northern Ireland To Escape Anti-Islam Violence

Fighting ISIS to Win

Syrian Rebels Admit They’ll Use US Aid To Fight Assad (and maybe ISIS)

Shells Land In Turkey As ISIS Advances On Syrian Border Town

Today in Cold War History
1950 – United Nations troops recapture Seoul from North Korean forces.
1960 – Fidel Castro announces Cuba’s support for the U.S.S.R.
1973 – Concorde makes its first non-stop crossing of the Atlantic in record-breaking time.
1980 – At the Oktoberfest terror attack in Munich 13 people died and 211 were injured.
1980 – The Cuban government abruptly closed Mariel Harbor to end the freedom flotilla of Cuban refugees that began the previous April.
1983 – Soviet military officer Stanislav Petrov averts a likely worldwide nuclear war by correctly identifying a report of an incoming nuclear missile as a computer error and not an American first strike.
1983 – Cosmonauts Titov & Strekalov are saved from exploding Soyuz T-10
1989 – Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze calls for total destruction of Soviet & US chemical weapons
In-Depth:
Sept. 26, 1983: The Man Who Saved the World by Doing … Nothing
1983: A Soviet ballistics officer draws the right conclusion — that a satellite report indicating incoming U.S. nuclear missiles is, in fact, a false alarm — thereby averting a potential nuclear holocaust.
Lt. Col. Stanislav Petrov was duty officer at Serpukhov-15, the secret bunker outside Moscow that monitored the Soviet Union’s early-warning satellite system, when the alarm bells went off shortly after midnight. One of the satellites signaled Moscow that the United States had launched five ballistic missiles at Russia.
Given the heightened tensions between the two countries — the alarm coincided with the beginning of provocative NATO military exercises and barely three weeks after the Russians shot down a South Korean airliner that had wandered into Soviet air space — Petrov could have been forgiven for believing the signal was accurate. The electronic maps flashing around him didn’t do anything to ease the stress of the moment.
But Petrov smelled a rat. “I had a funny feeling in my gut” that this was a false alarm. For one thing, the report indicated that only five missiles had been fired. Had the United States been launching an actual nuclear attack, he reasoned, ICBMs would be raining down on them.
“I didn’t want to make a mistake. I made a decision, and that was it.” Petrov’s gut feeling was due in large part to his lack of faith in the Soviet early-warning system, which he subsequently described as “raw.” He reported it as a false alarm to his superiors, and hoped to hell he was right.
Petrov was initially praised for his cool head but later came under criticism and was, for a while, made the scapegoat for the false alarm. Further investigation, however, found that the satellite in question had picked up the sun’s reflection off the cloud tops and somehow interpreted that as a missile launch.
Petrov lives today on his army pension in a village outside of Moscow.

DoD Policy Will Allow Some Immigrants in U.S. Illegally To Serve

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